Fragment Friday: Spennyriver Dispatch Edition

Spennyriver is a place I like to visit from time to time.  It's a fictional town deep in the heart of the Midlands, UK.  It's a bit different from what I usually write, but I think it fits into the weird category. The Dispatch is the local newspaper that keeps us up to date on all the … Continue reading Fragment Friday: Spennyriver Dispatch Edition

#NGHW Contest Begins!

Authors take note…

HorrorAddicts.net

The Next Great Horror Writer Contest started with one of Emz’s crazy, mad-cap ideas.

“What if we had a writing contest where the winner would get a book contract?”

HorrorAddicts.net had contests in the past. In fact, we’d run two writing/podcasting contests, the Wicked Women Writer’s Challenge and the Masters of Macabre Contest. Podcasters like H.E. Roulo, Rhonda Carpenter, Rish Outfield, and Philip Carroll won as well as awesome writers like Laurel Anne Hill, Shaunessy Ashdown, Rick Kitagawa, and Killion Slade. However, with the great “podfade” that happened in recent years, authors were less-willing to produce their own audio. So what to do?

We decided to base this new contest primarily on writing. The authors would not have to produce their own audioplays and they would be able to concentrate on their craft. But with an awesome prize like a full book contract, we would need a tougher competition. The author that…

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A Perfect 10 with Charles Yallowitz

If you like dystopian fiction, have a look at Charles Yallowitz’s interview over on Don Massenzio ‘a blog…

Don Massenzio's Blog

Today we sit down with author of fantasy and real world action dystopia, Charles Yallowitz. Charles will tell us about his inspiration, his writing and a bit about himself.

Please enjoy this edition of A Perfect 10.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


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  • Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Yes.  I do get a big rush from writing, especially when I start or am doing some of the…

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Fragment Friday: Jessica Bakkers Edition

Another week gone, and today for Fragment Friday, I present for your enjoyment a piece by author Jessica Bakkers, who is sharing an excerpt of her work-in-progress, Raising Death, the first book in The Guns of Perdition Saga. Jessica is not new to writing, but is new to the writing community and to sharing her work! … Continue reading Fragment Friday: Jessica Bakkers Edition

Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – 29th March 2017 – Nicholas Rossis, The Story Reading Ape, Patricia Salamone and C.S. Boyack

Quite a selection for your enjoyment today. Thanks Sally!

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Smorgasbord Blogger Daily

Welcome to today’s look at some of the blog posts I have enjoyed. I tend to have a wide taste in subject matter with books and writing obviously high on the list. But I would love it if you would share either one of your own posts or one that you have enjoyed by another blogger by leaving a link in the comments section of the post.

First is an opportunity to feature two bloggers author Nicholas Rossis with a post on the subject of Endbooks which make opening a print copy unexpected and a great way to segway into the writing. His post was inspired by the blog post by Sarah Laskow’s blog http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/best-endpapers-design-history

In the endless eBook vs. print debate, one aspect is rarely mentioned: the art of endbooks. And yet, as Sarah Laskow—my favorite Atlas Obscura blogger—points out, these can deliver a small jolt of wonder that…

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The creepiest (and best) creative writing exercise for character-development

Developing believable characters…

what a lot of birds

Writers are constantly asking: “how can I write believable, compelling characters?”, “how can I write realistic characters?”, “how can I write characters with depth?”
The answer is, it takes practice: and here’s one way to do that.

Characters are strange things. As writers, we like to think we’re in full control of our characters, that we decide who they are and what they do in a given situation. We like to think that we’re masters of their destiny. But this is a writing exercise that’ll make you think a little differently about the imaginary people we use to populate our stories, that’ll help you get to grips with their particular traits and foibles, and could just freak you out a little along the way.

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